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Hey, hands off of my stick! There was a bit of sibling rivalry over lunch today at our beaver live cam in Evo, Finland. Click on the link below to follow the lives of these beavers in real time from anywhere in the world!

areena.yle.fi/1-50696633

This is a joint project between the Kentällä - In the field team, Lammi Biological Station and Yle Luonto. There are 4 cameras streaming, that cycle through automatically. So far there have been close to 700,000 views... when will we make it to a million?
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Ever seen a black roe deer (metsäkauris), or maybe a white moose, or an unusual colour variant of any animal? We are interested to know where and when. Let us know in the comments (if you have a photo, please post that too!).

Black, or melanistic, roe deer are particulary common in northwest Germany and into the Netherlands where they can make up to 25% of the population. Recent research by Monika Reissmann and colleagues has managed to pinpoint the gene that causes melanism, which is a recessive trait. They even speculated that being black may actually have an advantage for the deer since it has become so common in the region. A black deer may just be that much harder to spot as they move about at night.

White, or leucistic moose, are particularly striking and have been found in populations across the northern hemisphere, including Finland and Sweden, It appears though that it is only ever a rare genetic variant. There may actually be an advantage to being white in that for example, in Sweden, hunters often choose to let the leucistic moose be, which may eventually lead to the white variant becoming more common.

Photos:Roe deer Hans Kampf, Moose Kristina Gannholt

Melanism in roe deer publication: www.researchgate.net/publication/342123384_An_Agouti-Signaling-Protein_Mutation_is_Strongly_Assoc...
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Finland is in the midst of a cold snap right now which helped produce this beautiful shot of freezing mist over the sea in front of University of Helsinki's Tvärminne Zoological Station.

www.facebook.com/Tvarminne/posts/3041172455985091Smoke on the water. Today the bay near TZS (Krogarviken) froze. Open water in the morning, smoking all day, and then a solid lid at the end of the day. Amazing to watch. Photo: Alf Norkko.
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The rewilding of the European continent continues 🙂

Yesterday the mammal society of the Netherlands discovered that their trail camera had recorded the entire Veluwe pack! This is the only wolf pack resident in the Netherlands, and they confirmed that 7 of 9 pups born since 2019 have survived. The high survival rate indicates that there is sufficient populations of deer and wild boar in the region for wolves to do well.

The Veluwe pack is the first to be resident in the Netherlands after a 140 year absence.
www.facebook.com/Zoogdiervereniging/posts/3843485649030723
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India is not only home to the tiger, it also has a smaller and yet very impressive namesake 🙂 The venomous tiger centipede can grow up to 20 cm in length and was filmed in the Western Ghats mountain range near Agumbe Rainforest Research Station. The Western Ghats are known for their exceptionally high endemism and the region is one of the world's hotspots for biodiversity.

www.facebook.com/agumberainforestresearchstation/posts/2679964278983284
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We have another report from Hanna Rosti who is #inthefield at the University of Helsinki's Taita Research Station in Kenya studying the 'creatures of the night' including the tree hyrax which looks to be a species new to science. Take it away Hanna!

We have been hard at work figuring out the life of tree hyraxes. Very little is known about them, as they live in the forest canopy, and it is difficult to even see them. But now with the help of a thermal imaging camera we are learning more each day. Conservation of this species is in great hurry, as in Taita Hills they only have about three square kilometers of habitat left!

One of the highlights of our fieldwork has been a chance encounter with a pair of suni deer. The walked right next to us and didn't seem the least bit afraid of the clicking of our cameras or our quiet conversation.

To get to the field I drive to the mountain with this motorcycle, which I really enjoy. My only problem is mites that are causing nasty bites. If you have any great ideas on how to get rid of them or how to prevent them from crawling up our boots and getting to our skin, I would love to hear it! One method we are having some success with is the use of double sided tape in the rubber boots to prevent them from climbing up.

To find more information about my research please visit animalstaita.com/
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